Encrypted Messaging Under Attack (again)

Here’s British Home Secretary Amber Rudd telling the BBC how law enforcement needs access to WhatsApp. A lone attacker who killed four people and injured fifty more in London last week apparently accessed the messaging service just before the attack began.

The pertinent sound bite from Ms. Rudd:

“It is completely unacceptable, there should be no place for terrorists to hide. We need to make sure that organisations like WhatsApp, and there are plenty of others like that, don’t provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other.”

The issue is, of course, that WhatsApp deployed end-to-end encryption across its platform in late 2014. That date is not insignificant; the Snowden revelations of 2013—that is, the indiscriminate spying of citizens by the NSA, GCHQ and other Five Eyes partners—are at least partly responsible for the rise of encrypted messaging, and indeed the full disk encryption now standard on both Android and iOS.

To believe that compromising WhatsApp will immediately make the world safer is more than a bit naive; The Independent ran a recent story on the former computer security chief for the UK’s Ministry of Defence, who points out rather obviously that those wishing to spread terror will just move on to something else.

Sources: BBC News, The Independent