A Year in Review: Summer, 2015

2015-2016

In these last few days leading up to December 25th I’m not anticipating much in the way of smartphone news. And since I’ll also be going on holiday at the end of the week I thought it might be a good time for a quick look back to reflect on the year we’re leaving behind.

Here’s part three of my four-part retrospective.

July

T-Mobile gains 2.1 million subscribers to overtake Sprint as the USA’s third largest carrier, due largely to the ongoing snark of the company’s outspoken CEO.

Motorola introduces a trio of handsets—the Moto X Style, Moto X Play and 2015 Moto G. Android users get handsets from Commodore and Marshall for some reason, and the hugely disappointing OnePlus Two prompts XDA to call this the year of the smartphone compromise.

Sources: Android Police, DSL Reports, Android Central, WIRED, The Verge, XDA

August

In the booming smartphone market of China Apple gets knocked down to third place by domestic OEMs Huawei and Xiaomi. But any fandroid celebrations are cut short by the discovery of the Stagefright exploit, which Google addresses by promising monthly security patches for Nexus devices. Google, by the way, is now part of a larger company called Alphabet.

Samsung also releases the Galaxy Note 5 and Galaxy S6 edge+, a little earlier than usual.

Sources: Business Insider, Android Authority (1) (2), Android Police, AnandTech

September

Apple unveils the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, which sell even better in their opening weekend than the previous year’s models. iOS 9 is also made available for older iPhones. But the spectre of XcodeGhost is also introduced this month, infecting a significant number of titles in Apple’s App Store.

Android Wear fans have two new options, the updated Moto 360 and the first-ever Huawei Watch. BlackBerry also makes it’s Android-powered Priv officially official. But the biggest Android news by far—even with all the leaks—are a pair of new Nexuses, the LG Nexus 5X and Huawei Nexus 6P.

Sources: Apple Insider, 9to5Mac, AnandTech, Ars Technica (1) (2), Android Police, CrackBerry, The Verge

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