A quick visual tour of Jolicloud 1.0

Today’s post comes hot on the heels of the announcement made yesterday by liliputing.com’s Brad Linder — that Jolicloud v1.0 is now officially available for your downloading pleasure.

I actually did the upgrade path through the pre-release version a few days ago, but since either will get you to the same destination, let’s have a look…

Update Now

Here is my official notice that I’ve been selected for the 1.0 upgrade (disregarding for a moment the email I received with the exact same information). This is about as easy and obvious an upgrade as I’ve ever seen in Linuxdom, and would be pretty hard to screw up — even for an absolute n00b.

Jolicloud Default

A few minutes and a restart later and I’m presented with this, Jolicloud’s default screen — the first-ever HTML5 desktop, if I’m not mistaken.

What’s not so impressive (at least for me) is the iPhone-style multi-paged display of apps. Maybe in a future version someone could at least include an option to sort them alphabetically?

Legacy Apps

If you’re wondering what the nagging synchronization alerts are all about, Jolicloud will now save your installed bookmarks apps for you and reinstall them when you migrate to a new netbook.

The grab above shows not the bookmarks but rather the local software on my Eee PC. Clicking on the “Local Apps” folder will take you to this next screen:

Local Applications

Finally, a terminal!

Fortunately you don’t have to burrow this deep to launch anything seen here — the tried and true “Alt+F2″ key combo will help you launch the app/bookmark of your choice.

If you want to test drive Jolicloud’s HTML5-powered desktop for yourself you can fire up your Chrome-based browser and visit my.jolicloud.com

It’s clearly not for everyone — my hairdresser is definitely a fan while another friend texted me last night and wants her Jolicloud replaced with something offering more in the way of offline oomph. Yes, the interface is simple almost to a fault, but that might just be Jolicloud’s biggest strength. I like to think of it as a Trojan horse of software freedom, wooing new netbook users away from Windows with big shiny buttons and letting them discover the FLOSS stuff on their own time.

And surely there can’t be anything wrong with that?

9 Responses to “A quick visual tour of Jolicloud 1.0”


  • Just wondering, since I don’t have a netbook, how does it run on a full fledged lappy. Sorry if my question sounds silly :-D

  • Just wondering, since I don’t have a netbook, how does it run on a full fledged lappy. Sorry if my question sounds silly :-D

  • Oh forgot, I’m in the process of downloading the ISO btw :-)

  • Oh forgot, I’m in the process of downloading the ISO btw :-)

  • I guess it would depend on your screen resolution? Pretty sure my Eee PC was running at 1024×768, so you should be fine.

    For someone like yourself it may be of limited value, though — there’s no GIMP, OpenOffice or even a music player installed by default…

  • I guess it would depend on your screen resolution? Pretty sure my Eee PC was running at 1024×768, so you should be fine.

    For someone like yourself it may be of limited value, though — there’s no GIMP, OpenOffice or even a music player installed by default…

  • Huh? Why’s that? Not so out of the box as I thought! :( Will still get a copy of the ISO just in case I got someone who uses a netbook. Adding to my collection of Linux ISOs :-D. Still Linux FTW!

  • Huh? Why’s that? Not so out of the box as I thought! :( Will still get a copy of the ISO just in case I got someone who uses a netbook. Adding to my collection of Linux ISOs :-D. Still Linux FTW!

  • Unless they changed something pretty drastic, you can still get your old offline apps using apt-get. That allows for a nice netbook interface, but you can have your tools sitting there for when you need them. I even installed wine and the old Evernote for Windows when I had Jolicloud on my netbook.

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