One month later.

A month ago today I officially kicked off this humble blog with a plug for Jonathan Zittrain’s excellent book, The Future of The Internet And How To Stop It. In it Zittrain warns of a dystopian future where the openness of the Internet and the personal computer give way to locked-down appliances and Big Brother surveillance.

Here’s a quick and informal survey of some stuff that’s happened since then:

Clearly I’m going to have to do better…

12 comments:

  1. AC:

    Throw in the ongoing copyright/fair use debates, and you (and Michael Geist) will be kept busy for decades!

    I think, as these challenges to openness continue to appear and the costs of using these controlled channels rises, that more end users will question the need to use paid options where free or low-cost ones exist. This will probably mean more piracy, of course, but I am optimistic that it will make the open source community to grow bigger and offer viable alternatives even at the enterprise level (as they’re starting to do so now).

    I currently use Microsoft Office at home, but only because I had a low-cost license via work (about $30). But, had I not had that option, I wouldn’t have shelled out for a full-price license, and I’d be using OpenOffice or some other open-source app suite instead. in the future, I’ll probably go open-source once I move to newer hardware.

    For me, the truly scary part of the equation is the ability of private companies and governments to track my life on the web. I am not optimistic about that aspect of the web at all, and I expect things to become more intrusive as we move our day-to-day lives into the digital world.

    Cheers,
    Ed

  2. AC:

    Throw in the ongoing copyright/fair use debates, and you (and Michael Geist) will be kept busy for decades!

    I think, as these challenges to openness continue to appear and the costs of using these controlled channels rises, that more end users will question the need to use paid options where free or low-cost ones exist. This will probably mean more piracy, of course, but I am optimistic that it will make the open source community to grow bigger and offer viable alternatives even at the enterprise level (as they’re starting to do so now).

    I currently use Microsoft Office at home, but only because I had a low-cost license via work (about $30). But, had I not had that option, I wouldn’t have shelled out for a full-price license, and I’d be using OpenOffice or some other open-source app suite instead. in the future, I’ll probably go open-source once I move to newer hardware.

    For me, the truly scary part of the equation is the ability of private companies and governments to track my life on the web. I am not optimistic about that aspect of the web at all, and I expect things to become more intrusive as we move our day-to-day lives into the digital world.

    Cheers,
    Ed

  3. I think a lot Internet users don’t realize that their activities are still fairly anonymous — in Canada, at least.

    According to Michael Geist, tools for advanced IP tracking, deep-packet inspection, etc. aren’t yet in the hands of our ISPs, and as far as I know no laws have been passed requiring them to hand over our data to anyone. Yet.

  4. I think a lot Internet users don’t realize that their activities are still fairly anonymous — in Canada, at least.

    According to Michael Geist, tools for advanced IP tracking, deep-packet inspection, etc. aren’t yet in the hands of our ISPs, and as far as I know no laws have been passed requiring them to hand over our data to anyone. Yet.

  5. AC:

    That’s the part that concerns me–the “yet” part…

    Speaking of paranoia, as I approach the end of my Bell Mobility contract, I’m starting to get thank you letters offering me the latest in Bell smartphones…

    keeping his eye on the sky,

    Ed

  6. AC:

    That’s the part that concerns me–the “yet” part…

    Speaking of paranoia, as I approach the end of my Bell Mobility contract, I’m starting to get thank you letters offering me the latest in Bell smartphones…

    keeping his eye on the sky,

    Ed

  7. I started a response to the Amazon bullet point and it got too long. The gist of it being that I don’t care about companies fighting over proprietary formats, locking the consumers out of choice, especially when the owners are being shortsighted and giving up their power.

    Are you taking guest-bloggers, Andrew?

  8. I started a response to the Amazon bullet point and it got too long. The gist of it being that I don’t care about companies fighting over proprietary formats, locking the consumers out of choice, especially when the owners are being shortsighted and giving up their power.

    Are you taking guest-bloggers, Andrew?

  9. Guest bloggers?

    Let me get this straight: You want me to pull back the curtain and give you access to my admin panel, thereby letting you see the proprietary technology and trade secrets behind the interwebz’ NUMBER ONE BLOG ABOUT OPENNESS AND TRANSPARENSEEZ?!1!

    Oh, rite…

    Your login is on its way — how’d you like to write tomorrow’s post?

  10. Guest bloggers?

    Let me get this straight: You want me to pull back the curtain and give you access to my admin panel, thereby letting you see the proprietary technology and trade secrets behind the interwebz’ NUMBER ONE BLOG ABOUT OPENNESS AND TRANSPARENSEEZ?!1!

    Oh, rite…

    Your login is on its way — how’d you like to write tomorrow’s post?

Comments are closed.